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Usual frequency of consumption of fast food by sex

Usual frequency of consumption of fast food by sex

In a comprehensive study of Australian secondary school students’ diet and physical activity, Cancer Council and the National Heart Foundation of Australia found that Australian teenage boys consume more fast food and snacks high in salt and drink more sugary drinks compared to girls and are more susceptible to junk food marketing.

Teenage boys were more likely to be regular consumers of fast food (46% compared with 34%) and sugary drinks (28% compared with 14%) than girls. In the month before the study, 53% of teenagers tried a new food or drink product that they had seen advertised, 40% bought an extra food product on display at the supermarket checkout and 35% chose a fast food outlet because it had a special offer or giveaway with the meal.

Morley B, Scully M, Niven P, Wakefield M. (2014). National Secondary Students’ Diet and Activity Survey, 2012-13: Melbourne: Cancer Council Victoria

 


Busted

Peters website www.fandangles.com.au/

Peters website www.fandangles.com.au/

A recent complaint about the Peters’ Fandangles ice-creams website has drawn an interesting response from the advertiser. Peters say that the focus of the website is on the main grocery buyer and the games were developed with women in mind; built to be played with one hand, “tapping into the insight that women often play games when multitasking”. However the Advertising Standards Board found that the games tab was to attract children to the website and the simplicity of the game meant that it was directed primarily to children. The Board also said that the ice-creams would be products that appeal to children.

However, Peters haven’t signed up to the Responsible Children’s Marketing Initiative. The Board considered the complaint about the ad under the Australian Association of National Advertisers Children’s Code which states that ads must not appeal to children to urge their parents to buy the product. We thought that requiring a code to unlock new games would encourage kids to pester for ice-creams but the Board said that it was not “a specific appeal to children to urge parents to buy the product” as “the parent or carer would remain the decision maker about whether or not to buy the product”.

We are also perplexed about how the Board interprets community standards. They said that while there was community concern about advertising unhealthy foods to children it does not amount to a community standard that advertising a food of a particular nutrition profile to children should be prohibited.